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T-Shirt Rope Toy DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic

Don’t throw away those old t-shirts until you read this!

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T-Shirt Rope Toy Tutorial from Functional Rustic. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Chewing on things appears to be our rescue dog’s favorite thing to do. And oh boy can she chew. She was given at least six dog toys at her first Christmas and by Valentines Day they were all destroyed. Maintaining her chewing habit was going to cost us a fortune! Unable to find a rope toy that could stand up to her mighty mouth I decided to make my own.

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Use T-Shirts to make toys for your dog or cat. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Using only t-shirts and scissors I created handmade toys for my animals.

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Rope Toy made from T-Shirts. www.FunctionalRustic.com

I grabbed a pair of scissors and a t-shirt from the good will donation pile and was on my way. My first attempt took longer than I care to admit but by the second I was a pro. Everyone got handmade dog toys that year!
You can create your own handmade gift for the animal in your life. Making a durable rope toy is not only easy but practically FREE! Keep reading and/or watch the video at the bottom to learn how I did it.
T-Shirt Rope Toy Tutorial from Functional Rustic
Materials
Old T-Shirt
Scissors
Approx. 15 minutes to complete
Directions
Step One:
Laying T-Shirt on a flat surface, use the scissors to cut from the bottom corner of the shirt up the seam to the sleeves. Do this on both sides of the shirt.

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Cut from the bottom corner of the shirt up to the sleeve. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Two:
Cut along the seams of each sleeve to remove the sleeves from the shirt.

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Cut along the seams of each sleeve. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Three:
Cut along the seam on the shoulder. At this point you should have two sleeves, a front and a back.

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Remove sleeves but cutting along the seams. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Four:
Set the sleeves aside. Cut the front and the back of the shirt into strips. Start at the shoulder and cut down to the bottom of the shirt. The strips should be at least an inch wide but could be as large as one third of the front or back of a shirt. I wanted to make several toys so I made my strips smaller.

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Cut the T-Shirt into strips. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Five:
Choose three of the fabric strips you just cut and tie the ends together.

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Select the 3 pieces of fabric you want to use. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Tie the ends of two strips together with a double knot and then tie the third strip to the knot. At this point there should be a lot of fabric hanging down one side and only three small pieces at the top. Continue to tie the small pieces to one another so you have a couple double knots on the top.

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Tie two pieces of fabric together at the ends. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Tie the third piece of fabric to the first two. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Tie everything as TIGHT as you can. With each knot, tug on all the fabric strips. Tug the way your dog would to ensure it is secure. If your short ends are too short to make many double knots it’s no problem, your original knots connecting the three strips together should be strong enough.

Tip: To ensure a tight start to the braid, wrap one of the strips around your toe (or another small secure item) before you start the braid. Watch the video for more information.

Step Six:
Braid the strips of fabric together. Braid them TIGHT! The braid should be so tight that it becomes stiff. In addition to the tight braid you will also need to add a few more knots. Every two or three inches you will want to tie some more knots. (Ex. tie strip A to strip B then tie strip C to strip A then tie strip C to strip B. How you tie the strips together is less important as the knot securing the braid above it.)

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Braid the strips together. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Tie knots every few inches. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Leave the ends long to make tassels. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Seven:
You should still have quite a bit of fabric hanging down.

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Continue to braid and tie knots every few inches. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Continue to tightly braid the strips and add knots as needed for stability. Once you get toward the end of the fabric you will want to save some fabric so you can tie several more knots.

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Adding knots in the braid helps to keep it secure. www.FunctionalRustic.com

The knots at the end keep the braid in place and provide a hand/mouth hold.

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Rope toy made from repurposed t-shirts. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Valencia Merble the Dog loves her rope toy. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Eight: (optional)
Add a handle for your dog rope to make it even more unique. Remember that small gap that was created when you wrapped the fabric piece around something small but secure? Well, using the discarded shirt sleeves and that hole you can add handle.

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Adding a handle keeps your hand safe from teeth and drool. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Adding a handle keeps you from having to bend over to play with your furry friend. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Take the seam of one of the sleeves and push it through the little hole. This will be tough because the hole should not be very big. Once the seam is all the way through you should have one part of the sleeve hole on each side of the toy. Grab one of the sleeve ends and pull it through the hole on the other side. Once you pull it tight it should form a secure handle that looks like the sleeve.

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Thread one of the sleeves through the “toe hole”. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Use the t-shirt sleeve as a handle. www.FunctionalRustic.com

If you are willing to sacrifice a few t-shirts you can make some very colorful chew toys for your furry friend. Although these toys are durable they are also very light. Makes for a great cat toy too!

Watch the T-Shirt Rope Toy Video Tutorial from Functional Rustic


Written by: Sarah Palmer – Owner, Functional Rustic

Originally Published at www.FunctionalRustic.com

Written by Sarah Palmer, Owner – Functional Rustic

Did you know Functional Rustic provides more than just Tutorials? Find out what others already know by shopping in the Functional Rustic Store.

Below are just a few of the handcrafted items available.

 

“Happy Holidays” Wooden Ornament

“Happy Holidays” Wooden Ornament by Functional Rustic is handcrafted from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint. Twine is used to hang the ornament. Free Shipping.

$10.00

 

 

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder – Black

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder from Functional Rustic adds a rustic elegance to any space. The 3 Tier Tea Light Candle Holder is made from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted. Free Shipping.

$15.00

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Reciprocating Saw TUTORIAL from Functional Rustic

Power tools are fun. Power tools that can destroy a piece of lumber in seconds are even more fun. With this sentiment in mind, Functional Rustic is proud to present this week’s DIY Tutorial teaching you the basics of a reciprocating saw and how to safely use a reciprocating saw to break apart a wooden shipping pallet.

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How to Use a Reciprocating Saw: DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic www.FunctionalRustic.com

The reciprocating saw is a small yet powerful tool that will make quick work of any boards that need to be rough cut. In addition to being effective it is also fairly straight forward to work with.

There are three main parts to a reciprocating saw.

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There are three main components of a reciprocating saw: saw blade, battery and saw. www.FunctionalRustic.com

3 Main Parts of Reciprocating Saw

1. Saw Blade

There are different sizes and uses for reciprocating saw blades. Some saw blades are intended for metal while others are better for wood. Also, you will find that the blades come in various sizes. Use which ever blade is most appropriate for your project.

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Reciprocating Saw Blade. www.FunctionalRustic.com

You many notice that my saw blade is silver and white. When new, the blade was white. However, the paint wears away the more it is used and that is why my blade has two colors.

When I first started cutting pallet wood with the reciprocating saw I used the longer saw blade. The blade became bent and unusable – I suspect that my body movements in reaction to the force of the saw caused the longer blade to bend. For that reason, I plan to only use the longer blades for thicker pieces of wood instead of on the thinner pallet boards.

2. Battery

The typical reciprocating saw uses an 18.0 volt battery or has a power cord attached. Battery operated saws allow for more mobility than the corded saw but have a limited supply of energy and need to be recharged often. My battery usually dies after a couple pallets so if I am breaking down more than two or three pallets than I need back up batteries. Fortunately it was not difficult to find multi-pack replacements online.

Once I learned how to attach and remove the 18.0 volt battery using the saw was quick and easy. Before I was taught how to do it though, I had quite a bit of awkward fumbling.

First, not all batteries look the same. The ones I have pictured have two different colors which make finding the release buttons easy. The first battery I encountered was solid black and the button was not as obvious.

Second, not all 18.0 volt batteries are the same size. In fact, the replacement batteries I have shown are rather large and awkward to handle with my hand size – perfectly normal hand size – compared to the original Ryobi batter that came with the saw.

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18.0 Volt Battery. www.FunctionalRustic.com

The black portion of the battery is the bottom and the yellow part is what is inserted into the saw. Inserting the battery simply involves putting the yellow part into the battery hole in the bottom of the saw.

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Insert 18.0 Volt battery into the bottom of the reciprocating saw. www.FunctionalRustic.com

To remove the battery from the saw you need to press both of the release buttons on the battery and pull the battery out of the saw. The release buttons are yellow on my batteries. As pictured above, to remove the battery I squeeze both the yellow buttons while also pulling up on the battery.

3.Reciprocating Saw

There are five components of the reciprocating saw that you need to be familiar with in order to use it.

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There are five main components to a reciprocating saw. www.FunctionalRustic.com

5 Reciprocating Saw Components

1. The Battery Location
The battery is inserted into the bottom of the saw handle. There will be a hole for the 18.0 Volt battery to plug in.

2. The Power Button
The power button is located on the handle of the reciprocating saw. To turn the saw on and move the blade you squeeze the button. The harder you squeeze the button the faster the saw cuts.

3. The lock button

The lock button is an important safety precaution. This button slides back and forth and allows you to lock the blade in place. For safety reasons it is always recommended that the saw be locked when not in use. The button is located on the top of the saw and slides right and left.

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Locked Reciprocating Saw. www.FunctionalRustic.com

The picture above shows a saw that is locked as demonstrated by the closed lock icon. When the button is moved to the right the saw becomes unlocked as show by the open lock icon as demonstrated below.

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This saw blade is in the unlocked position. www.FunctionalRustic.com

4. Saw Blade Release

The saw blade is attached to the reciprocating saw with a saw blade release located toward the front of the saw.

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Fold the blade release up in order to release the blade. www.FunctionalRustic.com

As pictured above, when the saw blade release is folded upward the lock is open and the blade can be inserted or removed. As pictured below, when the saw blade release is closed the blade is securely attached to the saw.

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Fold the blade release down to lock the blade in place. www.FunctionalRustic.com

5. Saw Blade Location

The saw blade is inserted into the front of the saw. Only when the saw blade release is open can the blade be successfully inserted. The part of the blade that has a hole in it is inserted into front of the reciprocating saw. The teeth, or sharp edges of the saw, should be facing downward. Once the saw blade is properly inserted into the hole the saw blade release can be closed to lock it in place.

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Insert the blade into the front part of the saw. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Safety First!

In addition to knowing about your saw it is also important to practice basic safety anytime you are working with power tools.

1. Wear protective eyewear to keep your eyes safe from flying debris.
2. Avoid baggy clothing so it does not interfere with power tool usage.
3. Wear work gloves to ensure a firm grip on the machinery.
4. If saw dust will be developing than be sure to wear breathing masks.
5. Always cut away from your body to minimize risk of injury.

Now that you know the basics of how the Reciprocating Saw works watch the video below to see how I use it to cut a wooden shipping pallet.

Use the comment section below to provide your feedback.

Written by: Sarah Palmer – Owner, Functional Rustic

 

Wooden Thank You Card RED

Measures 3.5 in x 3.5 in x 5/8 in. The handmade Wooden Thank You Card by Functional Rustic is the unique thank you gift you didn’t know you were looking for until now. The Functional Rustic Wooden Thank You Card is small enough to fit in your pocket and durable enough to take with you wherever you go. PLUS, the Wooden Thank You Card is made from a salvaged wood shipping pallet and then hand painted with oil paints. Every single Wooden Thank You Card is unique making each card a truly one-of-a-kind expression of gratitude.

$10.00

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Belt Sander DIY Video Tutorial from Functional Rustic

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The belt sander is my favorite piece of equipment in the barn. I use it for just about every item I build for the Functional Rustic Store. This week’s DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic is a video demonstrating how I use the belt sander. You will learn proper safety practices and the techniques I use with the sander to achieve the look I want on the wood.

The video tutorial below will answer any questions you may have about using a belt sander. The only bit of advice I forgot to mention in the video is to use a mask over your mouth to protect from inhaling saw dust. Sanding without a face mask will result in your nostrils and mouth being filled with saw dust. It’s gross. And  it is not at all healthy. I used to use a bandana to cover my mouth/nose, and that was better than nothing at all, but I now have actual wood working face masks.

My only complaint about wearing a face mask is that it causes my eye protection to fog up every time I breathe. I welcome any advice on how to remedy that problem. The protective eye wear is necessary but ultimately useless if I cant see what I’m doing anyways.

Enjoy the Belt Sander DIY Tutorial Video below and let me know what you learned or any advice you have for me going forward.

 

 

Written by: Sarah Palmer – Owner, Functional Rustic

Did you know Functional Rustic provides more than just Tutorials? Find out what others already know by exploring the Functional Rustic Store. Below are a few of the items available that I created using the techniques displayed in the video.

 

Mini Chalk Board – Green by Functional Rustic

The Mini Chalk Board by Functional Rustic is the fun and quirky handmade conversation piece you never knew you needed. The mini chalk board is made form repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint/chalkboard paint. Measurements: 19 in x 3.5 in x 5/8 in.

$15.00

 

“Meow Spoken Here” Wooden Ornament

“Meow Spoken Here” Wooden Ornament by Functional Rustic is handcrafted from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint. Twine is used to hang the ornament. Free Shipping.

$10.00

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How To Change A Drill Bit DIY Video Tutorial from Functional Rustic

It has been less than a year since I began my DIY journey and I have learned a great deal along the way. It is hard enough finding the inspiration and courage to begin a project, but the added stress of learning how to use the power tools can turn away even the most determined DIYer.

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How to Change a Drill Bit DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic.

You do not need any special training or experience to start your first DIY project. However, it is very helpful to know the basics regarding the tools you will be using. Functional Rustic is here to help!

I was embarrassed to ask someone to teach me how to change a drill bit. Technically I knew how to do it, but it took me forever each time I tried. I’m starting a wood working business and struggling to use a drill does not provide confidence. Fortunately my husband saw my struggle and realized I was never going to ask for help so he taught me a better way.

Learn from my struggles and approach your next project with confidence.

In this week’s DIY Video Tutorial from Functional Rustic I will teach you how to change a drill bit.

Let me know in the comments below if you found this Tutorial helpful. Be sure to share your next DIY project with other DIY enthusiasts at DIY Projects of Facebook.

Written by Sarah Palmer – Owner, Functional Rustic

Did you know Functional Rustic provides more than just tutorials? Find out what others already know by shopping in the Functional Rustic Store.

Below are just a few of the handcrafted items available.

 

“Quack Spoken Here” Wooden Ornament

“Quack Spoken Here” Wooden Ornament by Functional Rustic is handcrafted from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint. Twine is used to hang the ornament. Free Shipping.

$10.00

 

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder – Green

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder from Functional Rustic adds a rustic elegance to any space. The 3 Tier Tea Light Candle Holder is made from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted. Free Shipping.

$15.00

 

Mini Chalk Board – Green by Functional Rustic

The Mini Chalk Board by Functional Rustic is the fun and quirky handmade conversation piece you never knew you needed. The mini chalk board is made form repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint/chalkboard paint. Measurements: 19 in x 3.5 in x 5/8 in.

$15.00

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Fork Bending DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic

Ariel from the Little Mermaid was on to something when she started her collection of items in a cave under the sea. That’s a girl who sees potential in everything she finds. When Ariel saw a fork she thought it would be perfect for her flowing red hair. When I see a fork I see a treasure trove of opportunities to turn it into something both Functional and Rustic.

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In this week’s Functional Rustic DIY Tutorial we are learning how to bend cutlery to repurpose for crafts.

I was going through the garage when I came across a box with a few odd pieces of cutlery. Obviously, I had to try to repurpose them for something other than eating.
I cleaned off a fork, grabbed some needle nose pliers and started playing around. What I ended up with was a forking awesome rustic business card holder.

The first attempt was successful and not very difficult so I felt confident that I could do a video tutorial for my readers on only my second try. The plan was for it to be one continuous video. Like most repurposing projects around here however, things turned out differently than planned.

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That hole you see in the fork was made with a drill intended for metal. Easier to drill than I expected. Now I know how easy it would be to attach cutlery to a board if I wanted to use them as hooks. The possibilities are endless.

Watch the videos to learn how I created a Functional Rustic card holder/photo display out of a fork. Learn from my mistakes so when you repurpose your forks and spoons you will be prepared.

Well, that ended abruptly. Ha. As you may have noticed in the video, my business card holder is not quite functional yet. It is so non-functioning that it fell over onto the laptop and ended the video. The timing worked out well though because it gave me an opportunity to come up with a solution off camera. (Lot’s of swearing, ha.)

Seriously?! The camera cut out again? At least I was able to demonstrate how to make that final bend in the fork. Check out the final product in the final installment of the DIY Fork Bending Tutorial below.

Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to Functional Rustic on YouTube for the latest videos.

This particular tutorial could be both a “How To” and a “How Not To” tutorial. I thought about making another video where everything goes smoothly but, that wouldn’t be nearly as educational or amusing would it? (And the likelihood it would run smoothly the second time is probably low anyway, ha.) I want to teach you the basics and how to face obstacles you encounter. Repurposing projects are filled with things going wrong. Whether you are repurposing your life, your thoughts or an old piece of cutlery – things will fall apart and you will have to learn to pick up the pieces and start over.

I’m currently working on another cutlery project as a gift for my sister. She and her husband are skydivers so I am trying to make something skydive related for them. I call this stage of the project the “proof of concept” stage. Right now I have a general understanding of how I want it to look but, have not determined yet how to keep it together without duct tape. So far it is made of one spoon, two forks, duct tape and a pop can.

What do you think? Any suggestions on how to attach the spoons to the forks without duct tape? Better yet, any suggestions on how to secure it with duct tape and have it still look good? What would you be interested in seeing me try to create with cutlery?

Try bending forks and spoons for yourself and tell me how it worked out. I started DIY Projects of Facebook for the express purpose of providing a platform for you to show off things you create. Share you DIY stories, pictures and videos. Ask other DIY enthusiasts for advice on your DIY project.

As you may see in the above videos, I am a beginner too and can use as much guidance as I can get. Join the DIY Projects of Facebook Group and show us what you’ve made, tried to make or want to create.

Remember: All repurposing projects come with their own unique difficulties AND Do-It-Yourself does not have to mean doing it alone.

Written by Sarah Palmer, Owner – Functional Rustic

Did you know Functional Rustic provides more than just tutorials? Find out what others already know by shopping in the Functional Rustic Store.

Below are just a few of the handcrafted items available.

 

“Baby It’s Hot/Cold Outside” 2 sided Wooden Ornament

“Baby It’s Hot/Cold Outside” 2 sided Wooden Ornament by Functional Rustic is handcrafted from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint. Twine is used to hang the ornament. Free Shipping.

$10.00

 

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder – Orange

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder from Functional Rustic adds a rustic elegance to any space. The 3 Tier Tea Light Candle Holder is made from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted. Free Shipping.

$15.00

 

Mini Chalk Board – Green by Functional Rustic

The Mini Chalk Board by Functional Rustic is the fun and quirky handmade conversation piece you never knew you needed. The mini chalk board is made form repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint/chalkboard paint. Measurements: 19 in x 3.5 in x 5/8 in.

$15.00

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Indoor Duckling Enclosure DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic

Originally published April 23, 2018. Updated August 17, 2018.

Duckling season is upon us and that means people across the world are talking about how this is the year they will start raising their own ducks. Functional Rustic is here to help.

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Indoor Duckling Enclosure: DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic.

My first introduction to raising water fowl was in high school. The biology class was hatching ducks and geese. My understanding is that the eggs are incubated in the class and then when they hatch the students can take the ducks home for the weekend. All I know for sure is that my sister came home one day with 2 snow goslings, 1 mallard duckling and 3 baby chickens.

We lived in suburbia and already had a house full of animals. My dad was not having it but, the rest of us loved them so he got out voted. Normally what dad says goes, but when it involves an animal his opinion is moot.

Long story short, we learned that the birds were not a problem to take care of when it was warm but as soon as it got cold outside our suburban yard was not going to cut it. We ended up having to give them to a farm. (We had essentially stolen them from the school so we couldn’t very well return them to the teacher.)

IF YOU CANNOT PROVIDE A FOREVER HOME FOR THE DUCK — DO NOT GET A DUCK.

Getting a duck is like getting a cat or a dog. It is a commitment to years of animal care. It was wrong of us to take those birds when we were not prepared to care for them.
I learned a lot with those birds in the few months that we had them. 20 years later (oh my gosh, I can’t believe it’s been 20 years!) I finally have a barn of my own and can raise ducks properly.

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The Functional Rustic Barn. Home to Repurposing Projects and Muscovy Ducks.

The barn provides countless options for housing the ducks once they are bigger.

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The Muscovy Ducks of Functional Rustic. 3 of our Drakes (boy ducks) hanging out together.

I have Muscovy ducks. My mom does too. Her hen has hatched out 12 ducklings so far this year. (It’s the middle of April) One of my hens is sitting on eggs that should hatch any day. Until then though, I have zero ducklings and my mom has 12 — Not Fair!

My mom’s hen, Hazel, started to attack some of her babies. She even bit a chunk out of one of their cheeks. I had been asking to take some of her ducklings since the moment they hatched and she refused to share. However, with Hazel attacking her young my mom relented and let me have three.

There are many reasons I do not have the ducklings living in the barn right now — but I am not getting into that now. All you need to know is I have 3 ducklings living inside my house.

I may work in a barn but, I don’t want to live in a barn. If I’m going to have these adorable poop machines in my house I need an enclosure that keeps them enclosed and my house clean.

Here’s what I did:

Indoor Duck Enclosure: DIY Tutorial

Step One:
Find space in your home where you can construct an enclosure approximately 2 ft x 2ft. You can make it whatever size you want but make sure it can fit the ducklings and a cookie sheet inside it.

Step Two:
Find two trash bags and cut down the seams on each side. Cutting the sides is easy when you do it before you open the bag. I use 13 gallon trash bags so I needed two — but one large bag could do the trick.

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Cut the seams off of the garbage bag.

Step Three:
Open the trash bags and lay them flat on the floor where you want your enclosure. This will be the floor of the enclosure.

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Open the garbage bags you just cut and lay them flat on the floor. Blog Posts

Step Four:
Put a layer of newspaper on top of the trash bags. Wood chips could be put in place of or in addition to the newspaper. You want an absorbent surface. The ducklings will poop — all day, everywhere. It is a very wet poop and needs something to soak it up. Without an absorbent bottom you are just making a duck poop slip-n-slide.

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Put a layer of newspaper on top of the garbage bags. Add wood chips now too if you are using them

Step Five:
Find walls for your enclosure. Use whatever you have around the house. I recommend the wall be at least one foot high. Make sure your wall stays in place — that is to say, unmovable by ducklings.

The first enclosure I made used an empty pop can box as one of the walls. Those little duckers pushed through it within minutes. Make sure your wall cannot be pushed by the ducks; they’re stronger than they look.

(NOTE: My enclosure will have no roof on it. I am next to the enclosure while they are in it so I can keep the cats and dog away. Also, these Muscovy ducklings are learning to jump and try to fly. Escapes could happen even with 1 foot walls. At night they sleep in a brooder box with a lid. It is fine for overnight but too small for my growing birds during the day.)

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Find something that you can use for a wall that is at least 12 inches tall and heavy enough a duck cannot move it.

I had to play around with a few different items before I found walls that would work. The size of my enclosure ended up being around 2 ft x 2 ft because that is the size of my pallet storage shelves.

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Find something that you can use for a wall that is at least 12 inches tall and heavy enough a duck cannot move it.

For this enclosure I used what I had laying around — pallet projects. Specifically, I am using a small book case/storage shelf I built. It is heavy and a good height and shape for the project. (The ducklings can still escape through the cracks so I had to add boxes as a deterrent.)

I also used a mirror for one of my walls. The ducks get such a kick out of staring at and talking to themselves. It will get duck poo on it. Assume anything you put in the enclosure will get dirty.

Step Six:
Put all of your walls in place. Make sure to put your wall on top of the news paper. I initially had my wall outside the paper so I could fold the edges of the paper up along the inside of the enclosure. I thought it would protect the walls from duck presents.

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Put your walls into place. Be sure to completely enclose the space and put the walls on top of the newspaper.

Not only did it not protect the wall — it actually made it worse. They grab the edges of the paper and try to pull it up. Once they find the carpet they see there is no food and just hang out there. Pooping. For hours.

VIDEO of ducklings eating the enclosure.

Step Seven:
Add food and water. Put a cookie sheet underneath the water dish to catch spills. There will be spills. Ducks are messy.

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Add food and water to the enclosure. My ducks are starting to get too big for their bottle water dispenser so I have added a small bowl. They splash everywhere while they eat so the cookie sheet is essential

NEVER give medicated chick feed to ducks. But, do make sure that you are giving your ducklings food intended for babies. The main difference between adult and chick food is the size of the food. Chick food is very crumbly, almost powder like. The adult food comes in pellets or large crumbles. Little birds need little foods.

Ducks need water to eat. A duck can choke on their food if they do not have water near by to help them swallow. If you have food out for the ducks you MUST HAVE WATER out too.

The water should be deep enough for the duckling to submerge their bill.
Ducks are water fowl and love the water. New ducklings are not born waterproof though and need to be kept dry and warm. For this reason, small ducklings should not be given a pool to swim in — just a dish to drink from.

When the duckling is a few weeks old it will develop its waterproofing oils and can safely go in the pool. Even then, keep an eye on your duck to make sure it doesn’t stay too wet for too long.

VIDEO of the ducklings exploring the enclosure.

Step Eight:
Put your ducks into your enclosure and enjoy!

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Add your ducklings to the enclosure. Watch for any small areas they may be able to squeeze into.

VIDEO of the Ducklings in the enclosure.

VIDEO of the great duckling escape.

VIDEO of the great duckling escape 2.

Step Nine:
Take pictures of your creation and your adorable feather babies and share it with Functional Rustic on Social Media.

Written by Sarah Palmer – Owner, Functional Rustic

Did you know Functional Rustic provides more than just tutorials? Find out what others already know by shopping in the Functional Rustic Store.

Below are just a few of the handcrafted items available.

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder – Silver

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder from Functional Rustic adds a rustic elegance to any space. The 3 Tier Tea Light Candle Holder is made from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted. Free Shipping.

$15.00

“Mrs & Mrs/True Love” 2 sided Wooden Ornament

“Mrs & Mrs/True Love” 2 sided Wooden Ornament by Functional Rustic is handcrafted from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint. Twine is used to hang the ornament. Free Shipping.

$10.00

Posted on 2 Comments

Sensory Bottle Tutorial from Functional Rustic

Originally published April 27, 2018. Updated August 10, 2018.

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Sensory Bottle DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic.

Quick. Easy. Cheap. Fun. That is the theme for this week’s Tutorial from Functional Rustic. We are learning how to make sensory bottles out of water, oil, food coloring and a plastic bottle.

My Muscovy Hen is hatching ducklings today so I wanted a quick easy craft I could teach and then get back to my feather babies. This craft is great because it is quick, easy and uses common supplies so I do not need look hard for the ingredients.

The sensory bottle is a great craft for people of all ages to enjoy. Follow the steps below, watch the video and then share you creations at DIY Project of Facebook so others can appreciate them too.

Sensory Bottle Tutorial by Functional Rustic

Materials: Water, Cooking Oil or Bath Oil, Plastic Bottle, Food Coloring, Glitter, Hot Glue

Step One: Find an empty plastic bottle with a twist on lid and rinse it out with water.

Step Two: Remove any labels on the bottle.

Step Three: Fill the bottle with water about half way to 2/3 full.

Step Four: Add one drop of food coloring to the water and mix it together.

Step Five: Add glitter. Approximately 1 teaspoon.

Step Six: Add Oil.

Step Seven: Screw the lid on and glue it with Hot Glue.

Step Eight: Take pictures and video of your creation and share it with Functional Rustic on Social Media.

Written by Sarah Palmer – Owner, Functional Rustic

Posted on 3 Comments

I Started My Own Business & I Have No Idea What I’m Doing

Originally published February 26, 2018. Updated July 31, 2018.

I started my own business, and I have no idea what I’m doing.

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I Started My Own Business and I Have No Idea What I’m Doing. www.FunctionalRustic.com
Functional Rustic Sign
www.FunctionalRustic.com Handmade Rustic Décor, DIY Tutorials, Quotations and Muscovy Ducks

I started my own business, and I have no idea what I’m doing.

Yep — that pretty much sums up the thoughts in my head right now. This blog is intended to be my place to share my journey as I intentionally repurpose my life — build my dreams out of what is in front of me. This is my diary.

That’s pretty messed up. I realize that I am about to base my livelihood on the personal blogging concept, but a diary used to be the place that we kept our secrets and our most private thoughts and fears. A personal place that we put tiny locks on to keep others out. Now, it’s a potential revenue stream.

My initial reaction to the concept is of disgust. The vanity of our generation to think that our personal struggles and day-to-day lives are not only of interest but also of value to others. It’s a very self-centered approach to life.

(Considering the purpose of my business is to motivate, inspire and teach — I’m off to a very questionable start.)

Last year I made a conscious choice to repurpose my life — to build my dreams with what is in front of me. It sounds so cliché or like one of the quotes I pin to Pinterest each day — but it’s true.

I decided who I wanted to be and started acting like her.

I envied people on Pinterest or Etsy that took a pallet and created something cool out of it. Or just had a problem and found a crafty fun solution. I wanted to be them — have their skill and creativity.

Back to Nature Tea Light Holder
Back to Nature Tea Light Holder. Made from salvaged wood, hand painted rocks, pine cones and twigs.

So, I started telling people I do wood working and repurposing projects. It wasn’t a lie — technically I had built things out of wood before and over the years I have repurposed many items around the house. There is a lot more to the story — but in short, because I told people I did DIY projects I then felt obligated to at least try to DIY something.

Now, at this time in my life I’m an emotional wreck. Trying to sell a house (that apparently had mold that needed remediation), buying a house, moving an hour into rural Michigan, Being responsible for 10 acres of land, feeling displaced by the new surroundings, finding a new career after leaving clinical social work, mourning the death of several friends and continuing to cope with already present anxiety and depressive symptoms.

I was exhausted. My beautiful surroundings got me through it. And finding the pallets and scrap wood the previous owner left behind. (During the tour of the house I mentioned to the sellers that I did wood working — when we bought the house the previous owners not only left all their scrap wood and pallets behind but offered to bring all the left-over wood they had from the barn they were constructing at their new home. They did this expressly because I told them I enjoyed wood working and repurposing pallets. If I hadn’t shared, they wouldn’t have shared.)

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The pallet that inspired the dream that is Functional Rustic.

I just began building stuff. It wasn’t for any real purpose — just to see if I could. I looked at pictures on Pinterest and tried to replicate them. I failed a lot. But what I ended up with was still really good. I was proud of myself. Considering how I was feeling at the time, being able to feel pride instead of grief or exhaustion was exhilarating. And being able to build housing to protect my ducklings made me feel a sense of security I was lacking after recent unexpected deaths.

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Functional Rustic repurposes pallet wood and other unique items to create handmade Functional Rustic Décor.

Now when I told people that I did woodworking I could show them a picture of something I created. Most people responded the same way I would have just a few months before, “That’s cool — I could never do anything like that. How did you do it? Where do you sell them?”

It was never about impressing others — I only wanted to show myself that I could do it. But when others said that I did something that they couldn’t do — I felt good. It may not be a good thing to say out loud — but I really enjoy being better at something than someone else.

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“Believe” Pallet Sign by Functional Rustic.

But I wasn’t better than them. I wasn’t doing something that they cannot do. They are no different than I was just a few months before. I’m simply doing something that they haven’t tried yet.

This realization in no way impacted my sense of achievement, but it did make me realize that there are a lot of people out there that could benefit from the empowering feeling of a DIY project.

So now I had a barn full of projects I created, ideas for a DIY blog and a need for a new career. Functional Rustic is born. I could sell the stuff I build and write a tutorial for each item. Buy it or Build it Yourself with Functional Rustic.

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It’s a great idea — but I don’t actually know how to build many things. There is no way I can pop out an original DIY tutorial on a consistent enough basis to garner any attention. And, DIY tutorials are helpful but not motivational or particularly eye catching. Needless to say, that thought pattern filled me with self-doubt and killed my inspiration and motivation to build anything. I was paralyzed by the magnitude of what I was going to have to do to accomplish my goal. And I was going to be doing it alone.

To get myself out of the pattern of self-doubt I turned again to Pinterest to read through the collection of quotes I have gathered over the years for just such an occasion. As I’m scrolling I see that almost every single quote has the website for a business on it and a link to their page. So I did the same.

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Be so strong that nothing can disturb your peace of mind. New quotes published daily by Functional Rustic.

I was feeling optimistic again. I’d taken a very effective coping skill and turned it into not only a means of advertising but also a source of inspiration for others that need a little boost of motivation. Creating quote pins and posting them is how I start my day now. Every. Single Day. Some people get pumped up going for a run or can’t start their day without taking a long shower — motivational quotes is what I utilize to get a good start to my day. I found a way to make something I love, something that I already have at my disposal — into an integral part of my livelihood.

The quotes have me motivated but, I still struggle with the creative aspect of repurposing at times. When that happens I just go for a walk around the yard. The property is stunning so it isn’t difficult to be inspired. The previous owner designed the landscape with great attention to detail. Many of the plants hold medicinal value and the flower beds are always in bloom with various bright colors. The diverse eco-systems she developed encourages diverse populations of birds, butterflies, frogs, deer and other wildlife.

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Pine trees tower of the Functional Rustic grounds.

If these sights and experiences inspire me — sharing them with others may inspire them too! The photos and videos also provide a behind the scenes look into where the items I sell are being crafted. If I had to choose between a wooden sign made in a factory or a wooden sign made in a barn shared with ducks and a turkey — I’m going with the barn.

Once again, I took my coping skill of going for a walk in nature into a vital aspect of my personal business.

Now it’s time to spread the word. Weeks of research on SEO’s hashtags, product tags, html codes etc. I’ve read blogs, watched TED Talks and signed up for several social media sites. (In the future I will detail what I did, what worked, what didn’t) The technical aspects are important but are my least favorite part of this process.

(UPDATE: Several months later I now know how to the technical tasks and really enjoy them. The more I understand how it all works the more excited I get to complete it.)

The part of social media I enjoy is the social part. Most of my time on social media platforms is spent looking for other DIY enthusiasts. I compliment them when I appreciate their creativity and ask questions to learn to do it myself. Asking people how they accomplished something makes them feel good — makes them feel respected and knowledgeable.

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You don’t build a business, you build people and then people build the business. Quotes published daily by Functional Rustic.

I know I feel amazing when someone provides genuine feedback on something I created or takes an interest in what I’m doing. Functional Rustic enables me to do that for others as my career. That single interaction is what all this is for.
All the projects, quotes, pictures, videos and stories I share are done so with the express purpose of having a positive impact on an individual — to hopefully spark a lifelong passion or be a catalyst for change in someone’s life. At the very least, I want Functional Rustic to be a pleasant distraction in an otherwise stressful day.

(UPDATE: analytics I have for my website show that most of my visitors come between the hours of 9 and 5. My goal of being a distraction for people during the work day succeeded!)

Each new addition to Functional Rustic is another extension of me — my quotes, my creations, my pictures, my animals (my God this is a very self-centered, egotistical business plan, ha). Until now though, I have been avoiding what makes Functional Rustic truly stand out — Me.

My choice to live intentionally — my failures — my successes — my sense of powerlessness — my self-doubt — my determination — my creativity — my obstacles — my story is Functional Rustic. For that reason — despite my initial feeling of disgust toward personal blogs as a business — I get it now and I support it.

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“Hope” Pallet Sign by Functional Rustic.

That’s what this blog is all about — the story of I’m building my dreams with what I have in front of me. I’ve repurposed my actions and thoughts to make my dreams a reality. My insecurities are now advertisements. My being distracted by the ducks is now a reason for people to tune in. My failures in creating a project turn in to amusing How Not To stories.

When I am scouring the internet looking for advice on how to do whatever it is that I’m doing — I am drawn to the stories that are personal. I like knowing that someone else felt the same insecurities when they started their own business or felt scared when they tried something completely new. I am inspired by seeing others face their fears or recognize opportunities where they previously only saw obstacles. I thrive on reading of people succeeding despite the odds being against them.

And that is why I’m sharing my story as I build the life I want with what I have in front of me.

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Promise yourself to see the sunny side of everything and make your optimism come true. Quotes published daily by Functional Rustic.

I started my own business and I have no idea what I’m doing — and that’s the point.

Written by Sarah Palmer, Owner – Functional Rustic

Did you know Functional Rustic provides more than just a blog? Find out what others already know by shopping in the Functional Rustic Store.

Below are just a few of the handcrafted items available.

 

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder – Black

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder from Functional Rustic adds a rustic elegance to any space. The 3 Tier Tea Light Candle Holder is made from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted. Free Shipping.

$15.00

 

 

“Baby It’s Hot/Cold Outside” 2 sided Wooden Ornament

“Baby It’s Hot/Cold Outside” 2 sided Wooden Ornament by Functional Rustic is handcrafted from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint. Twine is used to hang the ornament. Free Shipping.

$10.00

Posted on 1 Comment

T-Shirt Rope Toy DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic

Don’t throw away those old t-shirts until you read this!

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T-Shirt Rope Toy Tutorial from Functional Rustic. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Chewing on things appears to be our rescue dog’s favorite thing to do. And oh boy can she chew. She was given at least six dog toys at her first Christmas and by Valentines Day they were all destroyed. Maintaining her chewing habit was going to cost us a fortune! Unable to find a rope toy that could stand up to her mighty mouth I decided to make my own.

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Use T-Shirts to make toys for your dog or cat. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Using only t-shirts and scissors I created handmade toys for my animals.

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Rope Toy made from T-Shirts. www.FunctionalRustic.com

I grabbed a pair of scissors and a t-shirt from the good will donation pile and was on my way. My first attempt took longer than I care to admit but by the second I was a pro. Everyone got handmade dog toys that year!
You can create your own handmade gift for the animal in your life. Making a durable rope toy is not only easy but practically FREE! Keep reading and/or watch the video at the bottom to learn how I did it.
T-Shirt Rope Toy Tutorial from Functional Rustic
Materials
Old T-Shirt
Scissors
Approx. 15 minutes to complete
Directions
Step One:
Laying T-Shirt on a flat surface, use the scissors to cut from the bottom corner of the shirt up the seam to the sleeves. Do this on both sides of the shirt.

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Cut from the bottom corner of the shirt up to the sleeve. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Two:
Cut along the seams of each sleeve to remove the sleeves from the shirt.

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Cut along the seams of each sleeve. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Three:
Cut along the seam on the shoulder. At this point you should have two sleeves, a front and a back.

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Remove sleeves but cutting along the seams. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Four:
Set the sleeves aside. Cut the front and the back of the shirt into strips. Start at the shoulder and cut down to the bottom of the shirt. The strips should be at least an inch wide but could be as large as one third of the front or back of a shirt. I wanted to make several toys so I made my strips smaller.

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Cut the T-Shirt into strips. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Five:
Choose three of the fabric strips you just cut and tie the ends together.

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Select the 3 pieces of fabric you want to use. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Tie the ends of two strips together with a double knot and then tie the third strip to the knot. At this point there should be a lot of fabric hanging down one side and only three small pieces at the top. Continue to tie the small pieces to one another so you have a couple double knots on the top.

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Tie two pieces of fabric together at the ends. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Tie the third piece of fabric to the first two. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Tie everything as TIGHT as you can. With each knot, tug on all the fabric strips. Tug the way your dog would to ensure it is secure. If your short ends are too short to make many double knots it’s no problem, your original knots connecting the three strips together should be strong enough.

Tip: To ensure a tight start to the braid, wrap one of the strips around your toe (or another small secure item) before you start the braid. Watch the video for more information.

Step Six:
Braid the strips of fabric together. Braid them TIGHT! The braid should be so tight that it becomes stiff. In addition to the tight braid you will also need to add a few more knots. Every two or three inches you will want to tie some more knots. (Ex. tie strip A to strip B then tie strip C to strip A then tie strip C to strip B. How you tie the strips together is less important as the knot securing the braid above it.)

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Braid the strips together. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Tie knots every few inches. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Leave the ends long to make tassels. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Seven:
You should still have quite a bit of fabric hanging down.

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Continue to braid and tie knots every few inches. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Continue to tightly braid the strips and add knots as needed for stability. Once you get toward the end of the fabric you will want to save some fabric so you can tie several more knots.

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Adding knots in the braid helps to keep it secure. www.FunctionalRustic.com

The knots at the end keep the braid in place and provide a hand/mouth hold.

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Rope toy made from repurposed t-shirts. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Valencia Merble the Dog loves her rope toy. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Step Eight: (optional)
Add a handle for your dog rope to make it even more unique. Remember that small gap that was created when you wrapped the fabric piece around something small but secure? Well, using the discarded shirt sleeves and that hole you can add handle.

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Adding a handle keeps your hand safe from teeth and drool. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Adding a handle keeps you from having to bend over to play with your furry friend. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Take the seam of one of the sleeves and push it through the little hole. This will be tough because the hole should not be very big. Once the seam is all the way through you should have one part of the sleeve hole on each side of the toy. Grab one of the sleeve ends and pull it through the hole on the other side. Once you pull it tight it should form a secure handle that looks like the sleeve.

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Thread one of the sleeves through the “toe hole”. www.FunctionalRustic.com
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Use the t-shirt sleeve as a handle. www.FunctionalRustic.com

If you are willing to sacrifice a few t-shirts you can make some very colorful chew toys for your furry friend. Although these toys are durable they are also very light. Makes for a great cat toy too!

Watch the T-Shirt Rope Toy Video Tutorial from Functional Rustic


Written by: Sarah Palmer – Owner, Functional Rustic

Originally Published at www.FunctionalRustic.com

Written by Sarah Palmer, Owner – Functional Rustic

Did you know Functional Rustic provides more than just Tutorials? Find out what others already know by shopping in the Functional Rustic Store.

Below are just a few of the handcrafted items available.

 

“Happy Holidays” Wooden Ornament

“Happy Holidays” Wooden Ornament by Functional Rustic is handcrafted from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint. Twine is used to hang the ornament. Free Shipping.

$10.00

 

 

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder – Black

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder from Functional Rustic adds a rustic elegance to any space. The 3 Tier Tea Light Candle Holder is made from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted. Free Shipping.

$15.00

Posted on Leave a comment

Changing Chain Saw Chain Tutorial from Functional Rustic

At Functional Rustic, when the chain saw comes out that means my husband Dave is about to cut logs in preparation for heating our home with the wood all winter. It gets cold in Michigan so cutting and collecting all of that wood is no small task. Thankfully, Dave agreed to take some time out of his busy day teach me and you how he changes a chain saw blade.

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How to Change a Chain Saw Chain DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic. www.FunctionalRustic.com

This week’s DIY Tutorial from Functional Rustic is a video staring my amazing husband Dave. Normally in a Functional Rustic DIY Tutorial I (Sarah) would write out all of the steps in the process to accompany the video tutorial. However, Dave did a phenomenal job teaching us how to change the chain saw chain in his video that I am choosing not to add a step by step tutorial to go with it.
Watch the video Here or at the link below to learn from Dave how to change the saw on a chain saw.
Changing a Chain Saw Chain Tutorial Video:

Instead of providing step by step instructions about changing the chain saw chain, I am going to take use the remainder of this DIY Tutorial to talk about all the work Dave does around Functional Rustic. (Functional Rustic is a business I run out of our home/barn).

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The most beautiful way to start and end the day is with a grateful heart. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Doing it yourself does not have to mean doing it alone.
I am appreciative that Dave agreed to star in a tutorial for Functional Rustic and proud that he did such a great job – on his first try no less!! I am the only employee of Functional Rustic. I am solely responsible for every photo, video, website edit, tutorial etc. but as much as I complete all of these tasks on my own, I am able to do so more effectively because I have Dave behind the scenes providing support.
Dave is a Social Studies teacher during the school year and performs at local venues playing bass guitar with Motor City Acoustic Band. Check out their website to hear how they sound, see where they are playing next and how to book them for your venue or private event.

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Motor City Acoustic Band. Picture from http://motorcityacoustic.com/

First and foremost – I never would have thought to start my own business if Dave had never encouraged me. Dave saw what I was building and suggested the idea that people may want to buy what I build. He most definitely planted the seed for Functional Rustic.
Allowing/encouraging me to take over the entire barn and large portions of the house for my business – talk about a great husband. It would be completely reasonable for him to insist that work be done in only certain areas. He has learned I am happiest and complete my best work when I am able to spread everything out in front of me and see it all at the same time from different angles. #happywifehappylife

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If you have the power to make someone happy please do it. You might be the one to make all the difference in their world. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Dave also provides more hands on work. He is a strong guy and if you think I am not going to use his muscles to my full advantage, you are sorely mistaken. With the exception of all the online parts associated with Functional Rustic, all the work involved is very laborious.

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Dave and Gladys wood working in the barn. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Having a second set of hands to carry, build and destroy things with me is incredibly helpful. Many hands make for light work. Also, Dave taught me how to use most of the tools I have so obviously he knows what he is doing. He also works faster than I do. (I get distracted more easily by the ducks and turkey. Ha.)
Each time Functional Rustic has had an in-person sale – Dave was there. He missed one day of the craft show due to having a show for MCAB the same day. He made more money than I did that night so he was definitely where he needed to be!

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Dave in the Functional Rustic Display at the Berkley Days Craft Show. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Loading the truck/jeep is not a quick task – even with two people. The shelves I build are made of pallets so they are large and durable – but they still need to be transported with care to protect the paint.
Carrying heavy items and putting them into the truck is one thing, but Dave is also learning, aptly I might add, how to support me when I’m freaking out about the show/sale. I’ve noticed that the more we load and unload the vehicles, the less stressful it all becomes.
In addition to lifting heavy things needed for Functional Rustic – he finds them too! He often comes home with a truck full of items I can repurpose.

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Dave found wooden pallets for me to repurpose! We will probably use these for the floor of our wood shed. www.FunctionalRustic.com

I mentioned Dave the musician, but he is what I call Traditionally Artistic as well. He can draw! I’m admittedly jealous at how well he can write/paint whimsical letters. I’m proud when my hand writing is at least legible. Ha, we all have our strengths. Below is a picture of a sign he made for me – he hand drew the letters and then wood burned them onto a perfectly sanded piece of barn wood we salvaged.

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Fairy Tale Trail Woodburned Signed made for me by Dave. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Dave being naturally artistic enables him to provide helpful feedback on my creations and ideas for new projects. He is very talented and I want to hire him, but his substitute teaching is our only source of income now so probably better to keep him where he is. I will just appreciate him for the summer months.
The most important thing that Dave does for me, does for Functional Rustic, is believe in me.

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“Believe” Pallet Sign by Functional Rustic. www.FunctionalRustic.com

He shows his belief by showing up. Literally – he is physically there. He doesn’t need to be. I always planned on being alone for shows anyway – his physical presence validates my optimism. This may be my show but he his by my side the whole way. Awwww.
Just recently Dave got to work on getting craft shows booked. I am especially pleased about this kind of help. I am going through some emotional growth changes right now. Positive growth is good but comes with growing pains. Needless to say this has been a high growth week for me. Ha. And Dave completing the necessary tasks of the business while I complete my emotional growing pains has been supportive on many levels.
First, craft fairs are how Functional Rustic sells the handmade rustic furniture and décor created. We are trying out to different venues but, craft fairs will be a primary money source.
Second, he was able to spend an afternoon finding out all the necessary information to get us signed up. (Stay Tuned to find out where to find us!) A task like that requires at least an afternoon and I struggled to make the time. I have actually compiled several of these lists in the past year but have long missed the deadlines to sign up. Dave providing the time and follow through is just what I need in order to focus on things like writing blogs and tutorials.
Third, Dave did the leg work without being asked. He saw it was on the Functional Rustic to-do list and he to-did it. It took me several months to get used to being a business owner/sole employee and to find a system that worked for me and the environment I wanted.

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Don’t be afraid to start over. It’s a brand new opportunity to rebuild what you truly want. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Not long after I found my rhythm (about two weeks ago) for doing everything that needed to be done for the business by myself Dave was added to the process. As I stated – he is good at what he does, hard working and efficient but, a second person was not part of the system I just established.
It is taking me time to adjust to having a second person. I feel responsible for the growth of the business and trusting someone else to do what needs to be done has been a challenge.

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Surround yourself with inspiring beings. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Thankfully for me, I have Dave by my side to face these challenges. We have come a long way together and each day we improve. Functional Rustic may be a business I am doing-myself but being open to the support of others enables me to actually do what I need to do for myself.

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And so together they build a life they loved. www.FunctionalRustic.com

Remember, doing it yourself is great but sometimes in order to do it yourself you need a little support from a friend.

Written by: Sarah Palmer – Owner, Functional Rustic

Did you know Functional Rustic provides more than just tutorials? Find out what others already know by shopping in the Functional Rustic Store.

Below are just a few of the handcrafted items available.

 

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder – Gold

3 Tier Wooden Tea Light Holder from Functional Rustic adds a rustic elegance to any space. The 3 Tier Tea Light Candle Holder is made from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted. Free Shipping.

$15.00

 

“Naughty/Nice” 2 sided Wooden Ornament

“Naughty/Nice” 2 sided Wooden Ornament by Functional Rustic is handcrafted from repurposed pallet wood and hand painted with oil paint. Twine is used to hang the ornament. Free Shipping.

$10.00